Mr Richard Selway, Consultant Neurosurgeon

Mr Richard Selway MA MMedSci MB BChir BSc FRCS(neurosurg)

Consultant Neurosurgeon

MA MMedSci MB BChir BSc FRCS(neurosurg)

Areas of expertise

  • Neurosurgery of epilepsy
  • Movement disorders
  • Degenerative spine disease
  • Spinal disorders and surgery
  • Parkinson's disease

Address

  • London Neurosurgery Partnership

    78 Harley Street, London, W1G 7HJ

  • The Harley Street Clinic

    35 Weymouth Street, London, W1G 8BJ

  • King's College Hospital (Denmark Hill) (NHS)

    Denmark Hill, London, Greater London, SE5 9RS

  • About Mr Richard Selway

    GMC number: 3430484

    Year qualified: 1989

    Place of primary qualification: University of Cambridge

    Areas of expertise

    • General neurosurgery
    • Back pain
    • Sciatica
    • Arm and neck pain
    • Spinal surgery
    • Lumbar
    • Cervical disc degeneration
    • Brain tumours
    • Spine tumours
    • Image guided brain surgery
    • Hydrocephalus
    • Endoscopy
    • Epilepsy surgery
    • Functional neurosurgery
    • Movement disorders
    • Headaches
    • Facial pain

    Professional memberships

    British Olympic Association
    Royal Statistical Society
    International League Against Epilepsy
    Society of British Neurological Surgeons

    Articles by Mr Richard Selway

    Low frequency centromedian thalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation for the treatment of super refractory status epilepticus

    Subacute neocortical stimulation (SNCS) and its effects on epileptic activity in adults and children diagnosed with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD)

    O-arm stereotactic imaging in deep brain stimulation surgery work ow

    GNAO1-related movement disorder with life-threatening exacerbations

    Neurosurgery and coronavirus

    Encoding of long-term associations through neural unitization in the human medial temporal lobe

    The subcortical belly of sleep: new possibilities in neuromodulation of basal ganglia?

    Acute bilateral foot drop with or without cauda equina syndrome