Dr Simon Lack, Physiotherapist

Dr Simon Lack PhD MSc (SEM) BSc (Hons) (Physiotherapy)

Physiotherapist

PhD MSc (SEM) BSc (Hons) (Physiotherapy)
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DrSimon Lack,Physiotherapist

Dr Simon Lack is a recommended Physiotherapist

Moving Beyond Exercises for Managing PFP, Patella Tendinopathy and Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Moving Beyond Exercises for Managing PFP, Patella Tendinopathy and Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Patellofemoral Pain

Patellofemoral Pain

Areas of expertise

  • Lower limb; knee, knee cap pain
  • Knee arthritis
  • Spine
  • Physical therapy
  • Rehabilitation & exercise prescription
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Recommendations for Dr Lack

These recommendations are for information purposes only. Doctors providing recommendations do so in good faith and are not responsible for clinical outcomes.

Recommended by:

  • byMr Kash Akhtar, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

    He is an excellent physiotherapist, particularly skilled in the management of patellofemoral pain. Simon and I regularly liaise about patients and have occasionally undertaken joint consultations, something that has really helped manage complex patients. He has excellent interpersonal skills and is good fun to work with. I have received consistently excellent feedback from mutual patients that Simon has treated, and I would have no hesitation in recommending Simon to close family or friends.

  • byDr Catherine Lester, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Dr Simon Lack is a highly respected academic, professional, and very knowledgeable. I have had the pleasure of knowing him for almost ten years and have found him to be empathetic and an excellent communicator. I would have no hesitation sending a family member to Dr Lack.

  • byDr James Noake, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Mr Simon Lack is an internationally renowned physiotherapist in the workup and management of patellofemoral pain. He's published important research with respect to the condition. He's probably the definitive opinion in managing anterior knee pain, certainly in London.

  • byMs Louise Stirk, Podiatrist

    Dr Simon Lack has an extensive knowledge in patellofemoral syndrome. He has recently completed his PhD in it. He is very knowledgeable with regards to managing knee pain.

  • by Dr Markus Laupheimer, Musculoskeletal and Sports Consultant Physician

    Dr Simon Lack has a professional attitude and knowledge. With an focus on the most challenging lower limb rehabilitation problems. He will also help with patients who had long journeys of treatment of their patellofemoral joint pains. Only can highly recommend Simon.

  • byMr Kash Akhtar, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

    He is an excellent physiotherapist, particularly skilled in the management of patellofemoral pain. Simon and I regularly liaise about patients and have occasionally undertaken joint consultations, something that has really helped manage complex patients. He has excellent interpersonal skills and is good fun to work with. I have received consistently excellent feedback from mutual patients that Simon has treated, and I would have no hesitation in recommending Simon to close family or friends.

  • byDr Catherine Lester, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Dr Simon Lack is a highly respected academic, professional, and very knowledgeable. I have had the pleasure of knowing him for almost ten years and have found him to be empathetic and an excellent communicator. I would have no hesitation sending a family member to Dr Lack.

  • byDr James Noake, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Mr Simon Lack is an internationally renowned physiotherapist in the workup and management of patellofemoral pain. He's published important research with respect to the condition. He's probably the definitive opinion in managing anterior knee pain, certainly in London.

  • by Dr Markus Laupheimer, Musculoskeletal and Sports Consultant Physician

    Dr Simon Lack has a professional attitude and knowledge. With an focus on the most challenging lower limb rehabilitation problems. He will also help with patients who had long journeys of treatment of their patellofemoral joint pains. Only can highly recommend Simon.

  • byMs Louise Stirk, Podiatrist

    Dr Simon Lack has an extensive knowledge in patellofemoral syndrome. He has recently completed his PhD in it. He is very knowledgeable with regards to managing knee pain.

  • Address

    • Telephone or video consultation

      Available for patients, please call to arrange, EC2R 8AR

    • Pure Sports Medicine, Bank EC2R

      41-47 Threadneedle Street, London, EC2R 8AR

    About Dr Simon Lack

    HCPC number: PH74042

    Year qualified: 2005

    Place of primary qualification: Brunel University London

    Dr Simon Lack completed his PhD at Queen Mary University London (QMUL) in 2017, studying the interaction of hip and foot biomechanics in the presentation and management of patellofemoral pain. He graduated from Brunel University in 2005 with a first class degree in physiotherapy, and went on to study an MSc in Sports and Exercise Medicine at QMUL in 2010. Simon is now a lecturer and is the Lead of the MSc in Sports and Exercise Medicine programme at QMUL, he shares the Head of Research role and is a Specialist Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist at Pure Sports Medicine. Simon is also the Head of Medical Services for the ‘High Performance Sport’ Programme at the University of East London. Previous experience includes junior and senior roles within the NHS, working in New Zealand with professional golfers, local rugby and football teams, and working for both large and small London based private practices.

    Areas of expertise

    • Physical therapy
    • Injury prevention
    • Sports injuries
    • Knee arthritis
    • Musculoskeletal
    • Manual therapy
    • Exercise prescription
    • Sports medicine
    • Rehabilitation
    • Pain management
    • Musculoskeletal physiotherapy
    • Biomechanics
    • Dry needling
    • Rehabilitation psychology
    • Shoulder
    • Knee
    • Taping
    • Acupuncture
    • Orthopedic
    • Lower limb; knee and knee cap pain
    • Spine
    • Research

    Frequently asked questions

  • What are the common symptoms that your patients tend to present with?

    Patients often present to me in clinic with pain that is having a negative impact on their function. Whether that is activates of daily living or preventing them from partaking in sports. I mostly see patients with knee complaints, but also those who have problems with their lower back, hips, ankles or feet. When people present with knee complaints, they may also report episodes of the knee giving way, locking, swelling or clicking.

  • What are the treatments that you're able to offer your patients?

    As a Physiotherapist we are trained to assess and diagnose injuries or pain complaints. We achieve this diagnosis through a process of asking specific questions and testing different movements or activities. At Pure Sports Medicine we are very fortunate to work as part of a multi-disciplinary team. If we identify problems that would benefit from another specialists assessment, we can refer you to a colleague.

    Following an assessment, I will inform you of the reason why you are experiencing the problems you have presented with, I will discuss your management options and will deliver the treatment(s) that have been agreed upon as the best way to proceed.

  • What are your areas of sub-specialist interest?

    Since 2011 I have focused on knee pain and in particular pain originating from the knee cap. I completed my PhD in 2017 which investigated the influence of hip and foot movement on knee cap pain. I looked at the effects of an exercise intervention directed at the hip and knee, and orthoses for the foot, to see how it changed the way in which people with knee cap pain move. I have spoken internationally on the topic both during and since my PhD. I now teach internationally on the topic, delivering a course to other health care professionals with my colleague Dr Bradley Neal.

    I have a particular interest in education in general, and currently lead the MSc programme in Sports and Exercise Medicine at Queen Mary University London. One of the longest running MSc programmes in the field, we pride ourselves in delivering education to Physiotherapist, Osteopaths, Doctors and Podiatrists.

  • Professional memberships

    HCPC
    British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine
    Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports and Exercise Medicine (ACPSEM)
    The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

    Articles by Dr Simon Lack

    How to manage patellofemoral pain – Understanding the multifactorial nature and treatment options

    Patellofemoral Pain with Dr Simon Lack & Brad Neal

    Medial and Lateral Patellofemoral Joint Retinaculum Thickness in People With Patellofemoral Pain: A Case-Control Study

    Risk factors for patellofemoral pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Queen Mary University London: one of the longest established masters of sport and exercise medicine globally (continuing professional development series)

    The interaction of hip and foot biomechanics in the presentation and management of patellofemoral pain

    Proximal muscle rehabilitation is effective for patellofemoral pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    The 'Best Practice Guide to Conservative Management of Patellofemoral Pain': incorporating level 1 evidence with expert clinical reasoning

    Outcome predictors for conservative patellofemoral pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    The immediate effects of foot orthoses on hip and knee kinematics and muscle activity during a functional step-up task in individuals with patellofemoral pain

    The effect of anti-pronation foot orthoses on hip and knee kinematics and muscle activity during a functional step-up task in healthy individuals: a laboratory study

    Patellar taping for patellofemoral pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical outcomes and biomechanical mechanisms

    Gluteal muscle activity and patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review