Mr Raju Ahluwalia, Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeon (Foot and Ankle)

Mr Raju Ahluwalia BSc, MBBS, MRCS, FRCS (Tr & Orth), Dip Sports & Exercise Medicine (RCS Edin)

Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeon (Foot and Ankle)

BSc, MBBS, MRCS, FRCS (Tr & Orth), Dip Sports & Exercise Medicine (RCS Edin)
MHS-COVID-19 Telephone Consultations
MHS-COVID-19 Online Video Consultations

Areas of expertise

  • Keyhole ankle surgery
  • Hind-foot & mid-foot correction
  • Fore-foot reconstruction (including bunion surgery)
  • Diabetic foot surgery & complex reconstruction including deformity correction
  • Lower limb trauma surgery
MHS-COVID-19 Telephone Consultations
MHS-COVID-19 Online Video Consultations

Recommendations for Mr Ahluwalia

These recommendations are for information purposes only. Doctors providing recommendations do so in good faith and are not responsible for clinical outcomes.

Recommended by:

  • byMr Edmund Fitzgerald O’Connor, Plastic and Reconstructive Consultant Surgeon

    Raju is a great surgeon , he cares deeply for each and every patient he treats , I highly recommend him

  • byMr Edmund Fitzgerald O’Connor, Plastic and Reconstructive Consultant Surgeon

    Raju is a great surgeon , he cares deeply for each and every patient he treats , I highly recommend him

  • Address

    • Telephone or video consultation

      Available for patients, please call to arrange, Sevenoaks , TN13 2JD

    • Sevenoaks Medical Centre

      Beadle House, London Rd, Sevenoaks, TN13 2JD

    • BMI The Blackheath Hospital

      40 - 42 Lee Terrace, Blackheath, London, SE3 9UD

    • London Bridge Hospital

      7 Tooley St, London, SE1 2PR

    • Gutherie Clinic King’s College Hospital

      Denmark Hill, London, SE5 9RS

  • King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

    King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London, Greater London, SE5 9RS

  • About Mr Raju Ahluwalia

    GMC number: 6029438

    Year qualified: 2001

    Place of primary qualification: University of London

    Mr Raju Ahluwalia is an orthopaedic surgeon specialising in foot and ankle surgery at King’s College Hospital, London. His practice covers all aspects of foot and ankle surgery. His special interests are in foot and ankle surgery, keyhole ankle surgery, hind-foot and mid-foot correction, fore-foot reconstruction (including bunion surgery), diabetic foot surgery and complex reconstruction including deformity correction and lower limb trauma surgery. He advocates the use of Patient Related Outcome Measures in foot and ankle surgery.

    Mr Ahluwalia graduated from Guys, King’s & St Thomas’s in London with a BSc in Immunology and won a bursary and further scholarship to continue his research from Guys and St Thomas’s Hospital. After completing his early surgical training on the King’s College rotation he was appointed to the Cambridge training program. He completed his training on the Chelsea and Westminster Rotation with additional training at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore where he worked with some of the UK’s best foot and ankle surgeons. He undertook SAC recognised advanced fellowships in arthroscopic and minimally invasive surgery, ankle arthroplasty, limb reconstruction and diabetic foot practice. He was awarded the Diploma of Sports and Exercise Medicine from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh
    Mr Ahluwalia is a consultant at the prestigious Kings Diabetic Foot Unit and an invited member of the Diabetic Foot Study Group and part of the International Diabetic Foot Care Group. He has been faculty and lecturer of a number of FRCS and Trauma Courses and part of the organisational team of the annual King’s Charcot Reconstruction Meeting, at the Oval, London. He is actively involved in training young doctors at Guy’s, King’s and St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School and supervising trainees from the London Deanery.

    Mr Ahluwalia has published many peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. He is regularly invited to present in major national and international meetings including American Orthopaedic Foot Ankle Society, British Orthopaedic Foot Ankle Society and British Orthopaedic Association.

    Areas of expertise

    • Ankle and tendon injuries 
    • Ankle fractures
    • Ankle replacement
    • Ankle sprains and instability
    • Arthroplasty
    • Bunionettes
    • Calcaneal fractures
    • Calf tightness and achilles disorders
    • Complex pilon fractures ligament reconstruction
    • Complex reconstruction including deformity correction
    • Flat and high arched foot deformity and reconstruction
    • Foot & ankle trauma surgery
    • Forefoot, mid foot & hind foot reconstruction surgery for arthritis
    • Fusion surgery
    • Hammer toes
    • Keyhole ankle surgery
    • Lis franc injuries
    • Lower limb trauma surgery
    • Metatarsalgia
    • Minimally invasive techniques
    • Morton’s neuroma
    • Neurological foot problems
    • Orthopaedic surgery
    • Primary & revision surgery
    • Revision arthroscopic ankle fusions
    • Simple and complex diabetic foot problems
    • Sports injuries and tendinopathies around the ankle
    • Sports medicine (ligament reconstruction)  
    • Surgical and non-surgical management of plantar fasciitis
    • Total ankle replacement

    Professional memberships

    British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society
    Medical Protection Society
    British Medical Association (BMA)
    Royal College of Surgeons
    Faculty of Sports & Exercise Medicine
    Duchenne Family Support Group
    American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS)

    Articles by Mr Raju Ahluwalia

    Referral of patients with diabetic foot ulcers in four European countries

    Charcot foot reconstruction outcomes

    Infected open calcaneal fractures

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures

    The challenging narrow proximal femur

    Admission Time Deep Swab Specimens Compared With Surgical Bone Sampling

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures

    Fast?track pathway for diabetic foot ulceration during COVID?19 crisis

    Bilateral distal fibula stress fractures in late pregnancy

    Challenges of one-year longitudinal follow-up of a prospective, observational cohort study using an anonymised database