Mr Stephen Davies, Physiotherapist

Mr Stephen Davies MSc, BSc

Physiotherapist

MSc, BSc
MHS-COVID-19 Telephone Consultations
MHS-COVID-19 Online Video Consultations

Areas of expertise

  • Running injuries
  • Shoulder
  • Sports injuries
  • Low back pain
  • Neck
MHS-COVID-19 Telephone Consultations
MHS-COVID-19 Online Video Consultations

Recommendations for Mr Davies

These recommendations are for information purposes only. Doctors providing recommendations do so in good faith and are not responsible for clinical outcomes.

Recommended by:

  • byDr Rick Seah, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Mr Stephen Davies is a very experienced physiotherapist. He enjoys treating spinal injuries. We've had quite a few cases where we successfully managed patient symptoms.

  • byDr Rick Seah, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Mr Stephen Davies is a very experienced physiotherapist. He enjoys treating spinal injuries. We've had quite a few cases where we successfully managed patient symptoms.

  • Address

    • Telephone or video consultation

      Available for patients, please call to arrange, E14 4QT

    • Pure Sports Medicine, Canary Wharf E14

      Level 2, Cabot Place West Canary Wharf, London , E14 4QT

    About Mr Stephen Davies

    HCPC number: PH104914

    Place of primary qualification: Queen Mary University of London

    Stephen did his Masters from Queen Mary University of London and currently works as a Physiotherapist at Pure Sports Medicine, Canary Wharf in London.

    His areas of clinical interest include running injuries, shoulder, sports injuries, low back pain, neck and research. His sporting interests are golf, rugby, triathlon, marathons and squash. He worked at Premier Physical Healthcare before joining Pure Sports Medicine London.

    Areas of expertise

    • Running injuries
    • Shoulder
    • Sports injuries
    • Low back pain
    • Neck
    • Research

    Frequently asked questions

  • What are the common symptoms that your patients tend to present with?

    It depends on which body part and the type of injury it is. However, people primarily come in complaining of pain. My initial treatment is to address their sympathetic nervous system and try to calm it down. What comes with pain can also, depending on the injury, lead to muscle guarding, overprotection, fear-avoidance, and maladaptive patterning. There is a lot of compensatory movement patterns that also occur with the element of pain.

  • What are the treatments that you're able to offer your patients?

    Nearly every single patient has a huge amount of education, and that's education about the pathology and prognosis and education about what I'm able to do and the services we have.

    If it was a low back patient, I would heavily go down along the biopsychosocial treatment line, which would encompass things like sleep, nutrition, exercise, posture, biomechanics of their movement and what things they do in the gym to fix and calm down their sympathetic nervous system.

    From a physio point of view, I would do soft tissue work, mobilisations, manipulations if appropriate, acupuncture, KT taping, exercise prescription for strength and conditioning, changing of maladaptive patterning like changing guarding patterns, prescription of the correct load for the patient to be able to tolerate.

    Depending on their activity or their chosen goal, I would then work towards conditioning that person for that specific sport. For example, if they were running, I would be doing a running analysis. If they want to return to the gym, it would be looking at weight training or whatever they have chosen to do. That would then be aligned quite closely with their goals, which I will then streamline to get the end result.

  • What are your areas of sub-specialist interest?

    My specialist interest would be acute and chronic low back pain, which is why my treatment includes the biopsychosocial aspect of treatment. I'm currently writing up a study at the moment which is on persistent low back pain in professional golf. My heavy reliance on this is because it's one of the most common reasons why people go to see their GPs and it's very common within all sporting athletes.

    My other specialised field would be running injuries. Being a runner myself, I like to look after hips, knees, and ankles. It can be an acute onset, a gradual onset as well as trauma.

  • Professional memberships

    HCPC

    Other specialists recommended by Mr Davies

  • Dr Rick Seah, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Dr Rick Seah has a high level of knowledge regarding sports and exercise medicine. He has an ability to taking everything into account, treating the patient holistically, and will always strive towards providing the most up-to-date and excellent intervention for the individual patients. We have worked well together with several patients where we have bounced ideas off each other to clinically reason a certain pathology which has led to a successful outcome.

  • Mr Thomas Ember, Consultant Orthopaedic and Spinal Surgeon

    Mr Thomas Ember makes the right choice for his patients at the time. We've shared a lot of complex patients together, whether it's intervention through imagery and potential injection, has allowed for appropriate conservative care which has eventually led to a true revolution in the patient symptoms. However, when appropriate, a surgical option has been completed.

  • Mr Amit Amin, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Mr Amit Amin is extremely talented in his field, dealing with complex ankle injuries as well as being a big advocate of physiotherapy to manage more of the overuse injuries. I have a good working relationship with him where we have dealt with complex cases together.

  • Mr Livio Di Mascio, Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Mr Livio Di Mascio would treat his patients exactly the same whether it be private or NHS, which is all about making the right choice at the right time for that individual patient, whether it be a surgical option or whether it be a conservative care which he strongly supports and fits in physiotherapy as the appropriate intervention at that time.

  • Dr James Thing, Musculoskeletal, Sport & Exercise Medicine Specialist

    Dr James Thing has a good knowledge of rugby and athletics and also specialises in concussions. Being a sports doctor, he has to have a widened approach which aligns quite nicely with the physiotherapy approach of conservative management. We have a good working relationship together. We try to find the best interest for the individual patient.