Mr Giles Stafford, Orthopaedic Hip Surgeon

Mr Giles Stafford MBBS, BSc, FRCS

Orthopaedic Hip Surgeon

MBBS, BSc, FRCS
MrGiles Stafford,Orthopaedic Surgeon

Mr Stafford is a recommended Orthopaedic Hip Surgeon

Am I too young for a Hip Replacement?

Am I too young for a Hip Replacement?

Hip Replacement: How long will I be in hospital?

Hip Replacement: How long will I be in hospital?

What happens during a Hip Replacement?

What happens during a Hip Replacement?

Hip Replacement: Can I play sport afterwards?

Hip Replacement: Can I play sport afterwards?

Areas of expertise

  • Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) surgery
  • Hip and pelvis
  • Hip arthroscopy surgery
  • Hip replacement
  • Young adult hip

Recommendations for Mr Stafford

These recommendations are for information purposes only. Doctors providing recommendations do so in good faith and are not responsible for clinical outcomes.

Recommended by:

  • byDr Catherine Spencer-Smith, Consultant in Sport & Exercise Medicine

    He’s the only surgeon that I recommend to treat my hip patients. I work with elite level athletes and I know that in Giles’ hands they’ll get the very best of care and the very best surgical outcomes. He’s warm, approachable and really puts patients at ease. Having looked after over 4,000 patients with FAI, I know that Giles is the UK’s best hip surgeon.

  • byMr Maxim Horwitz, Consultant Hand Surgeon

    Mr Stafford is a trusted colleague. He is fellowship trained and a great listener and individualises care for his patients. His approach to the young persons hip problem is very respected amongst piers.

  • byMr Neil Dorward, Neurosurgeon

    Giles is a highly competent and caring specialist. He has pleasantly engaging and cheerful manner that will be most reassuring for his patients.

  • byMr Ian Sabin, Neurosurgeon

    Mr Giles Stafford is a hip specialist. I get nothing but good reports about his interactions with the patients I refer.

  • by Mr J Samuel Church, Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Mr Stafford is a well respected hip surgeon with excellent clinical knowledge and communication skills. I would highly recommend him.

  • by Ms Amanda Hall, Physiotherapist

    Mr Giles Stafford is a specialist who I can rely on for honest patient opinions and always undertakes surgeries in the best interest of his patients with precision and care.

  • by Miss Nicky Ellis, Osteopath

    Mr Giles Stafford is meticulous in the quality of his work, talks to patients in a language they understand and communicates quickly with practitioners.

  • byDr Catherine Spencer-Smith, Consultant in Sport & Exercise Medicine

    He’s the only surgeon that I recommend to treat my hip patients. I work with elite level athletes and I know that in Giles’ hands they’ll get the very best of care and the very best surgical outcomes. He’s warm, approachable and really puts patients at ease. Having looked after over 4,000 patients with FAI, I know that Giles is the UK’s best hip surgeon.

  • byMr Maxim Horwitz, Consultant Hand Surgeon

    Mr Stafford is a trusted colleague. He is fellowship trained and a great listener and individualises care for his patients. His approach to the young persons hip problem is very respected amongst piers.

  • byMr Neil Dorward, Neurosurgeon

    Giles is a highly competent and caring specialist. He has pleasantly engaging and cheerful manner that will be most reassuring for his patients.

  • byMr Ian Sabin, Neurosurgeon

    Mr Giles Stafford is a hip specialist. I get nothing but good reports about his interactions with the patients I refer.

  • by Mr J Samuel Church, Orthopaedic Surgeon

    Mr Stafford is a well respected hip surgeon with excellent clinical knowledge and communication skills. I would highly recommend him.

  • by Ms Amanda Hall, Physiotherapist

    Mr Giles Stafford is a specialist who I can rely on for honest patient opinions and always undertakes surgeries in the best interest of his patients with precision and care.

  • by Miss Nicky Ellis, Osteopath

    Mr Giles Stafford is meticulous in the quality of his work, talks to patients in a language they understand and communicates quickly with practitioners.

  • Address

    • The Wellington Hospital

      Wellington Hospital South Bldg, The, 8A Wellington Pl, London, NW8 9LE

    • London Bridge Hospital

      27 Tooley Street, Wimbledon, London, SE1 2PR

    • Telephone consultation

      Available for patients

    About Mr Giles Stafford

    GMC number: 4628891

    Year qualified: 1999

    Place of primary qualification: University of London

    Areas of expertise

    • Acetabular reconstruction
    • Arthroscopy
    • Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the hip
    • Bone conserving hip replacement
    • Bone conserving mini hip replacement
    • Bursitis (hip)
    • Customised hip replacement
    • Enhanced recovery
    • Femoroacetabular impingement
    • Hamstring tear
    • Hip and groin pain
    • Hip arthritis
    • Hip arthroplasty
    • Hip arthroscopy
    • Hip dysplasia (DDH)
    • Hip fractures
    • Hip impingement
    • Hip injections (including steroid, hyaluronic acid, PRP and nStride)
    • Hip preservation surgery
    • Hip replacement
    • Hip resurfacing
    • Joint injection
    • Keyhole hip surgery
    • Knee cyst
    • Knee injections (including steroid, hyaluronic acid, PRP and nStride)
    • Knee ligament repair
    • Labral repair
    • Labral tear
    • Minimally invasive hip surgery
    • Motion analysis
    • MRI scan
    • Muscle injury
    • Osteoarthritis
    • Partial knee replacement
    • Patella (kneecap) dislocation
    • Posterolateral corner injury
    • Postoperative rehabilitation
    • Revision surgery
    • Robotic assisted hip surgery
    • Sports injuries
    • Stress fractures
    • Total hip replacement
    • Total knee replacement

    Frequently asked questions

  • What are the common symptoms that your patients tend to present with?

    The most common thing is groin pain, which is pain felt at the top of the thigh. A hip pain is felt more laterally on the bony prospect that they can feel, but that's not necessarily the case. True hip pain is felt in the groin, in the top middle of the thigh.

    They often get pain sitting for long periods and stiffness getting up out of chairs. They will find that their sporting activity and sporting life is becoming increasingly limited. In more advanced cases, they find their work-life balance can be affected. They will find that sitting for long periods of time for commuting becomes increasingly difficult.

    Patients also regularly complain of clicking around their hip area, which is sometimes painful. As the hip is increasingly stiff, they often get back pain as well, or pain radiation down to the knee.

  • What are the treatments that you're able to offer your patients?

    With the regards to the treatments that I personally offer, I offer keyhole surgery for patients whose wear and tear in their hip is not too advanced, where they want plans to repair a damaged tissue and usually re-scope the hips, so it moves more freely and slows any progression of wear and tear changes.

    The other treatment that I provide is various forms of hip replacements which are tailored to the patients and their specific needs and anatomy. I do a range of different hip replacements, going from mini hips which are more bone-conserving styles of hip replacements through to more standard designs. As I mentioned, depending on what they need. I also exclusively use a ceramic-on-ceramic bearing which doesn’t produce any biologically-active debris and which we think is going to last the longest.

    I also do a lot of diagnostic injections as well, which is very useful because a lot of the patients feel that they have a lot of things going on, not just pure hip pain. There's often muscle balance issues. Often, a diagnostic injection into the hip joint or into one of the surrounding muscles is extremely helpful in trying to ascertain where the primary source of pain is coming from.

  • What are your areas of sub-specialist interest?

    My areas of specialist interests are mainly sports-related hip injuries and trying to keep people as active as possible for as long as possible.

    With this in mind, the first thing that tends to go in a hip is a tear of the labrum. People get labral tears for various reasons. Often, there's a mild shape abnormality of the hip. Occasionally, it's just due to a specific injury. A large part of my practice is repairing labrum for patients which will improve their symptoms.

    The other things that I also look at are mild shape abnormalities of the hip which tend to be more developmental or in people who have a very active lifestyle. I'm very interested in hip replacements in young people. I also do a lot of custom hip replacements if patient's anatomy requires it.

    I do hamstring repairs.

    What I've developed over years is Enhanced Recovery Technique, which was based on something I've had exposure to during my fellowships, but I'm on version 11 of the original now. That entails a very specialised, but not minimally invasive anaesthetic. Although patients sleep during their operation, they don't wake up feeling sick.

    With some techniques we use during the operations, we can mobilise a patient and get them out with physiotherapists around two hours post hip replacement. They can have physio two or three times a day and tend to go home after two nights.

  • Professional memberships

    Royal College of Surgeons of England
    British Orthopaedic Association
    British Hip Society
    International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA)
    British Medical Association (BMA)
    General Medical Council

    Articles by Mr Giles Stafford

    The effect of precautions on early dislocations post total hip arthroplasty

    Arthroscopic repair of delaminated acetabular articular cartilage using fibrin adhesive. Results at one to three years

    Patient-matched total knee arthroplasty

    Anatomy of the zona orbicularis of the hip

    Loss to follow-up after total hip replacement

    Clinical outcome following primary total hip or knee replacement in nonagenarians

    The young adult hip

    Validation of revision data for total hip and knee replacements undertaken at a high volume orthopaedic centre against data held on the National Joint Registry

    Fluid extravasation during hip arthroscopy

    Early to mid-term results of ceramic-on-ceramic total hip replacement

    Total hip replacement for the treatment of acute femoral neck fractures

    Is hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement only for athletes?

    Birmingham hip resurfacing--patient reported outcomes pre and post 'metal-on-metal' media attention

    The anatomy, diagnosis and pathology of femoroacetabular impingement

    Ischiofemoral impingement

    Other specialists recommended by Mr Stafford